Zeppelin Mania: In Those Days, Giants

The Graf Zeppelin Over Rio

On the Graf Zeppelin 

Hugo Eckener (translated from the German by Douglas Robinson)

I have always felt that such effects as were produced by the Zeppelin airship were traceable to a large degree to aesthetic feelings. The mass of the mighty airship hull, which seemed matched by its lightness and grace, and whose beauty of form was modulated in delicate shades of color, never failed to make a strong impression on people’s minds. It was not, as generally described, ‘a silver bird soaring in majestic flight,’ but rather a fabulous silvery fish, floating quietly in the ocean of air and captivating the eye just like a fantastic, exotic fish seen in an aquarium. And this fairy-like apparition, which seemed to melt into the silvery blue background of the sky, when it appeared far away, lighted by the sun, seemed to be coming from another world and to be returned there like a dream…

The mighty hull indeed! The Hindenburg weighed 236 tons, was 13 stories tall, and was nearly as long as 3 football fields. The 7 million plus cubic feet of hydrogen was sufficient to run an ordinary kitchen stove for several hundred years.

The 17 huge gas cells of the R 101 used the intestines of a million cows to provide the leak-proof lining.

However, not only were the ships of behemoth dimensions, so were their hangers. The Goodyear-Zeppelin hanger in Akron, Ohio was so huge clouds sometimes formed and a soft rain would fall.

And as Dr Eckener wrote, those giants of the sky were like something from another world, a dream world. They were exotic silvery fish of immense size and fairy origin.

John R McCormick’s account of seeing the Graf Zeppelin when a young boy fills me with envy. Here it is in part:

Out of the Blue

…I was a little uneasy. Something wasn’t quite right. Suddenly I realized why. We were alone, absolutely alone, and surrounded by a profound silence. That whole land, usually so full of sound and action, was empty and still. Even the animals were quiet. There was no wind, not the slightest breeze.

Into that remarkable silence there came from far away the smallest possible purring, strange and repetitive, gradually approaching, becoming louder — the unmistakable beating of powerful engines. I looked to the west and at first saw nothing. Then it was there, nosing down out of the clouds a half-mile away, a gigantic, wondrous apparition moving slowly through the sky.

“Grandma!” I screamed.

She was out of the kitchen door in an instant. I pointed to the sky. The great dirigible was very low, perhaps because the captain was trying to find some landmark.

There is a wonderful opening scene in the movie Star Wars. A great starship is passing very low and directly overhead so that one sees only the underside. That underside moves deliberately and interminably on and on until at last it is gone. The Graf Zeppelin, moving ever so slowly above us, was like that. We saw every crease and contour from nose to fins. It was so low that we could see, or imagined we could see, people waving at us from the slanted windows of its passenger gondola.

We stood entranced. Slowly, slowly the ship moved over us, beyond us, and at last was gone.

The above accounts and information are taken from one of the books in my library: The Zeppelin Reader: Stories, Poems, and Songs from the Age of Airships, edited by Robert Hedin. A fascinating book. Highly recommended!

Comments are always welcome! And until next time, happy reading!

Share This!
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest

Zeppelin Mania: My Library

The LZ-114 completed after WW I, turned over to the French, and renamed Dixmude.

Many of you are aware of my love affair with the airship and the rigid airship in particular.

Some of you have made comments on the seeming dearth of information on the airship. Well, Virginia, I’m here to tell you that isn’t necessarily so. There’s quite a bit of material out there. One just needs to know where to look.

To that end, I thought I’d share with you today the portion of my library dedicated to books about airships. Because inquiring minds want to know! The list below is divided into non-fiction and fiction.

If you have any additions, please let me know. Questions and comments are always welcome. Until next time, happy reading!

My Airship Library

Non-Fiction

  1. Airship: The Story of R.34 – Patrick Abbott
  2. Airships: Designed for Greatness – Gregory Alegi, et.al.; concept and artwork by Max Pinucci
  3. USS Los Angeles: The Navy’s Venerable Airship and Aviation Technology – William F. Althoff
  4. Airship on a Shoestring – John Anderson
  5. Hindenburg: An Illustrated History – Rick Archbold (text) & Ken Marschall (illus.)
  6. Dr. Eckener’s Dream Machine: The Great Zeppelin and the Dawn of Air Travel – Douglas Botting
  7. The Giant Airships – Douglas Botting
  8. TransAtlantic Airships: An Illustrated History – John Christopher
  9. The Zeppelin Story – John Christopher
  10. Zeppelins of World War I – Wilbur Cross
  11. Zeppelin Hindenburg – Dan Grossman
  12. Airships in Peace and War – R. P. Hearne
  13. The Zeppelin Reader: Stories, Poems, and Songs from the Age of Airships – Robert Hedin
  14. The Log of H.M.A. R34 Journey to America and Back – E.M. Maitland
  15. Inside the Hindenburg – Mireille Major (text) & Ken Marschall (illus.)
  16. The Hindenburg – Michael M Mooney
  17. Giants in the Sky: A History of the Rigid Airship – Douglas H Robinson
  18. LZ129 Hindenburg – Douglas H. Robinson, with scale drawings by Richard Groh
  19. My Airships – Alberto Santos-Dumont
  20. Schütte-Lanz Airship Design – Prof. Johann Schütte
  21. Slide Rule – Nevil Shute
  22. The Great Dirigibles: Their Triumphs and Disasters – John Toland
  23. Airship Saga: The history of airships seen through the eyes of the men who designed, built, and flew them – Lord Ventry & Eugene M. Koleśnik
  24. Jane’s Pocket Book of Airship, ed. by Lord Ventry & Eugene Kolesnik
  25. Zeppelin: The Story of a Great Achievement – Henry Vissering
  26. Airship Aerodynamics Technical Manual – War Department
  27. “Zeppelin’s New Age of Air Travel” in Popular Mechanics, July 1994
  28. “Blimps: Billboards in the Sky” in Smithsonian, June 1998

Fiction

  1. Airship Nine – Thomas H. Block
  2. With Airship and Submarine – Harry Collingwood
  3. Seize the Wind – John Gordon Davis
  4. Lester Dent’s Zeppelin Tales – Lester Dent
  5. Death on the Empress – Stuart Harper
  6. Goliath – Richard Turner
  7. Beyond the Rails – Jack Tyler
  8. Wings of Fury – R.N. Vick

My Own Novels

  1. The Moscow Affair (From the Files of Lady Dru Drummond, Bk 1)
  2. The Golden Fleece Affair (From the Files of Lady Dru Drummond, Bk 2)
  3. Take to the Sky (The Rocheport Saga, Bk 7 – forthcoming)
  4. Rand Hart and the Pajama Putsch
Share This!
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest

8 Sentence Sunday on Dieselpunks #18

Last week, we left Rand Hart in the midst of the final hand of a poker game on the Hindenburg. This week we pick up where we left off. Herr von Osler does not have enough chips to match what Hart has put into the pot and has offered to write a check. Hart replies to the German industrialist.

“That gold ring on your finger. I’ll settle for that.”

The German was conflicted. He looked at Hart, looked at the cards in his hand, shrugged, pushed his chips into the center of the table, and took the ring off his finger. He looked at it for a moment, then placed it amongst the chips.

Herr von Osler flipped his cards over. “Four eights, mein Herr.”

Hart turned his cards over and said, “Four Jacks.”

To be continued!

If you write or read Dieselpunk, join in the fun: 8 Sentence Sunday on Dieselpunks.

Share This!
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest